A Travellerspoint blog

Goodbye Cambodia :(

My last few weeks in Siem Reap were really busy. We had some people from a company that makes hearing aids come to school to conduct some hearing tests. The teachers were asked to identify kids in their class that they thought might be hearing impaired and so we all trooped to school on a Saturday morning to check them out. As it turned out, everyone’s hearing was fine, but the expressions on the boys faces were priceless. Even though one of the examiners spoke Khmer and explained what they’d be doing, there was quite a bit of apprehension, not only from the kid getting tested, but those waiting in the wings as well.
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I went downtown to have my traditional farewell dinner at the Red Piano and eat my last dish of fish amok -definitely not as good as the version I cooked with Hout, but still chngnang (Khmer for delicious- and one of the hardest words for a barang (foreigner) to pronounce). From the balcony of the restaurant, I watched the tourists succumb to the infamous powdered milk scam: a Khmer lady dressed in rags and holding a listless baby walks up to a tourist. They say they don’t want money, they only want the tourist to buy the hungry baby some milk. The tourist is led to a specific store, the powdered milk is purchased and the tourist goes away thinking they did something good. However, the babies are just props, sometimes drugged to make them look more pathetic. The “mother” then sells the powdered milk back to the shopkeeper and the money is split 50/50. There are posters all over town warning people of the scam, but some people clearly have not read them. I saw 2 people get conned in the first 10 minutes I was there- I really was surprised how successful this scheme was. I thought about calling down to them to warn them, but didn’t want the scammers lying in wait for me after dinner, so I let it go.
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I couldn’t leave the country without a last look at the temples that drew me here. The first time I saw a photo of Angkor Wat I was hooked. They are beautiful, mysterious and at 700 years old, amazingly well preserved (though I worry about their future with the hoards of tourist that flock here every year). The fabulous and fierce Khmer empire built the largest temple complex in the world and essentially ruled all of Southeast Asia from the 11th to 13 centuries. The temples have beautiful carvings that detail their rich history, but sadly, very little of it sticks in my brain- too many Hindu and Buddhist gods that I just cannot keep straight, so you’ll have to read the Wiki page- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khmer_Empire1837A254F5CC0AFD4A16F3FF31FE7DC7.jpgIMG_1638.jpg90_IMG_1657.jpgIMG_1658.jpg

I love the Buddha faces at Bayon temple, the beautiful face of this Khmer woman and the carvings of Apsara dancers.
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Ta Prohm temple and the amazing 400 year old trees growing on it.
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It’s always sad leaving Siem Reap. I can’t describe how much I love this little town, my students and the Khmer people in general. Every day is interesting, different, hot and a just a tiny bit dangerous (mainly the traffic!). The city is growing and changing a bit too fast for my taste though- the next time I return a few more local shops and food stalls will likely have been replaced with yet another brand name T shirt/sneaker store. I guess that’s “progress” ☹.
Next stop – 3 weeks of eating my way through Thailand (again) and exploring part of the country I didn’t visit on my last trip: the southern Thai beaches and islands. What a life!

Posted by travelinglisa 03:36 Archived in Cambodia Comments (0)

Hello Hong Kong!

It was so great to see Aida and Jose, even though the trip didn’t turn out quite as planned. There was a problem with Aida’s passport and she couldn’t get on the flight to Cambodia. I was SO looking forward to showing them around town and having them visit the school. All was not lost, as I ended up just meeting them in Hong Kong. It was weird being in a such an urban city again- everyone was clean and well dressed and all the places had air conditioning. Lots of banks and shopping malls, but also lots of exotic Asian stuff.

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We took a couple of walking tours and they were really awesome. The tours had an interesting social/political bent so we really got the local flavor. Especially interesting to Aida and I was the Kowloon tour, which focused on the affordable housing issues in HK. It’s one of the most expensive cities in the world to live in, and they have the same problems as the US. If you’re middle/upper income, you can afford an apartment. If not, you just live in a small apartment with your family practically forever (the median age for a young adult to move to their own place is 35!). If you’re poor or disabled, your options are cardboard shacks hidden under the metro overpass, in a cage – yes, a freaking cage
( http://all-that-is-interesting.com/cage-homes-hong-kong ) or renting a mattress on a stairwell.

Here’s the goldfish market. Since apartments are so small, these are common pets and gifts. Sadly, after a couple of days, the unsold fish die in their little bags.
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The Chinese are very superstitious and quite serious about Feng Shui. Big, sophisticated companies pay their Feng Shui Master a small fortune for their advice. For example, a new building with architecture that looks like a sharp glass edge, that could resemble that of a knife, was built next to HSBC (Hong Kong Shanghai Banking Corporation). Since that could be interpreted as a blade “attacking” HSBC, their Feng Shui advisors commissioned an art piece that looks like a cannon be built on the top of the HSBC building as a “defense”.
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We had some cloudy days, but the skies cleared in time for the sound and light show seen from a boat crossing Victoria Harbor, touristy but fun.IMG_1563.jpgIMG_1559.jpg270_IMG_1529.jpg
We ate some delicious and interesting food- dim sum (of course!) and rice porridge. Hong Kong has a bunch of Michelin star restaurants, some are just small local places.
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There are lots of dried fish and fungus shops along with local medicine shops.
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This is a deer placenta and fetus, I forget what illness it’s supposed to be good for. I cannot imagine how sick I’d have to be to eat it. Also, lots of deer femurs in bins- I didn’t buy any of those either.
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Our walking tour also took us to a local neighborhood to show us some small traditional business that are going to be defunct soon due to mass production and automation. We went to a printing shop which still does hand typesetting and a tailor that does beautiful traditional handmade Chinese dresses (all seemed to be in size XXXS).
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We visited the paper goods area too. All of these things will be burned during religious festivals/ceremonies/funeral as offerings to gods and ancestors. Apparently, Gucci thought the paper handbags looked too realistic and sent letters to the shops warning them about trademark infringement. Judging by the huge number of Gucci and other really high end designer stores in HK, I don’t think anyone’s business is being damaged.
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Man Mo Temple, built in 1847 and honors the gods of literature and martial arts/war. It’s common for students to come here to pray for good grades during exam time.
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Even though it’s a really expensive city, I wished I would have stayed for a couple more days of exploring- I feel like I only scratched the surface (plus it was great that everywhere was air conditioned- Cambodia is freaking hot in April!) Thanks so much to Aida and Jose for adding this leg to their China trip! Who's coming to visit me next?!!!!??

Posted by travelinglisa 07:13 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (0)

Happy Khmer New Year!

April Siem Reap


View Travelinglisa's Great Adventures on travelinglisa's travel map.

Had lots of free time on my hands this month since school is closed for Spring vacation and Khmer New Year, so over the holiday Jim and I went to Hout’s family’s house in a small village in the countryside, about a 2 hour drive from Siem Reap.

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His father is a rice farmer and all the relatives living in the village are involved in the rice noodle making process. All the work is done either by hand (old rice is used as fuel to boil the rice) or via a primitive machine powered by a car battery. It’s very hot and hard work, but the rice noodles are delicious.IMG_1388.jpg
Huot’s mom made me my favorite Khmer noodle soup with fresh noodles and tons of herbs and the next night we had some delicious fish and rice and all the mangos I could eat. Amazing hospitality- I’m so grateful to have experienced this slice of life in rural Cambodia.
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Unfortunately, the dirt road in front of the family house also serves as the local cockfighting ring. Around 10 am the men start bringing their favorite roosters - there’s much discussion about who’s is the fiercest, betting odds, etc. Then they set up the ring in the road and have at it for the next 5 hours. To keep time on the rounds, an incense stick is lighted and when it burns down, the round is over. Usually the fights are only on Sunday, but since it’s the holiday, they do it every day. ☹ There are some things about living here that are hard to stomach sometimes, that’s for sure. IMG_1397.jpgIMG_1399.jpgIMG_1413.jpg
In the afternoon, we went a boat ride down the small river across the road, disembarking via a steep and slippery slope to visit more relatives and eat their yummy mangos. IMG_1433.jpg IMG_1405.jpg
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After that we went on motos to the fair at the local pagoda, then to a local picnic area. The moto ride was the MOST FUN EVER! In nearby Thailand the new year coincides with Songkran Festival -celebrated by splashing water on friends and relatives for good luck during the new year. Cambodia has adopted this part of the holiday and added a new twist- talcum powder face. Here’s the scenario: lined along the roads are small (or not so small) bands of kids and teenagers armed with the widest variety of giant squirt guns in the world. Don’t have a fancy squirt gun? No worries, just get a bucket or a hose. When a moto goes by ( and remember everyone drives about 10 miles/hour) ATTACK! Drench, and I mean DRENCH, the bikers then slap talcum powder on their faces. Some of the kids get in the backs of trucks and do roving counter attacks on the people on the side of the road and also on unsuspecting motos. It was soooo much fun- we were the only non Khmers in town, so it was especially fun for them to soak and powder the Barangs!!!
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The picnic area was really pretty (if you ignore all the litter), full of flowers and selfie taking Cambodians. We sat in the sun to dry out, had a well deserved beer and some snacks and observed the newest fashion trend taking Cambodia by storm- Hawaiian shirts! After an hour or so, we headed back on a different route only to get ambushed/soaked/powdered all over again! Good times !
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In the morning, we all went to the local temple to make New Year's offerings of cash and rice to the monks.90_IMG_2259.jpg90_IMG_2253.jpg

During Khmer New Year, there was a music festival in town and I got to see the famous blind Cambodian muscian Kong Nai playing the chapei dong veng. He's known as the Khmer Ray Charles and he does a bluesy kind of rap, too bad I could only understand a few words.IMG_1381.jpg

I also finally had time to visit the Cat Pagoda run by Josette, a lFrench woman who runs Siem Reap Pagoda Cats http://pagodacatssiemreap.org/ - it's totally funded by donations, so if you can send a few dollars her way, it would be much appreciated. There are so many sick, starving and stray animals here, it's heartbreaking. Josette does an amazing job working in partnership with the local vets to help as many as she can. If anyone knows a vet interested in volunteering some time here, please let me know; their help is sorely needed and I can't imagine a more interesting or rewarding experience. Many of the rescues are housed at a Pagoda and some stay at the "cat spa" in her house until they are ready to be adopted or move to the pagoda. Ironically and horrifyingly, on my way back to town after my visit I passed a roadside food stand advertising dog meat. IMG_1490.jpgIMG_1486.jpg

Thanks to everyone who's followed my move from Travelpod to this new site, hope you'll sign up for the RSS feed (if anything is not working, please email me or message me on FB to let me know). AKUN TRANG (Khmer for thank you very much!!!) to my BFF Deb, who stepped in during my technological meltdown to help ensure all my old blog posts were saved for posterity!!

Posted by travelinglisa 20:04 Archived in Cambodia Comments (0)

Spring in Siem Reap

What a fun month March was! There was a music festival in town and I got to see some amazing bands in some very cool venues. I think my favorite was the Kampot Playboys- Khmer rock and roll! Electric guitars and a traditional Cambodian instrument that give everything a slightly "Devil Went Down to Georgia" sound. I'm officially in love with the lead singer (so what else is new!).

Also saw Joss Stone in the garden of a very fancy new hotel- only about 350 in the crowd- it was awesome!!! She put on a great show despite being bombarded by flying insects attracted to the stage lights. The opening act was at the rooftop bar- a Khmer tenor with string quintet. Seriously, am I actually in Cambodia???!!!

Contrast that with a trip to the local street night market- families set up along the 60 Road for a half a mile on both sides of the road to sell clothes, shoes, food, there are carnival games and kiddie rides. It all goes up at 4:30 and is completely broken down by 11- every night! I went there particularly in search of this noodle soup I like- 6 of us had soup, beer, some stuff in a banana leaf and some rice balls- all for under $10. And, to top off a great night, I won 2 cans of beer popping balloons with darts!

Jim and Hout had me over for a cooking class to learn how to make fish amok- my favorite Cambodian dish. The secret is slicing lemongrass, scallion, galangal, thai basil, kafir lime leaf, turmeric and some other unidentified leaves into diagonal slivers, pound it in a mortar and pestle until your arm is screaming, then pound some more. It all goes into this little basket that you fold from a banana leaf and stick together w/ toothpicks then you steam it w/the fish and coconut milk. The state of my baskets (and pretty much all of my cooking/chopping skills) were cause for much hilarious laughter from the Khmer contingent. It was a super fun evening and the amok turned out quite delicious if I do say so myself!

School is good, the kids are so much fun to work with and are constantly surprising me. We had an issue with kids not bringing their pencils to class and passing out/sharpening new pencils took time away from the lesson, so I made a rule that those that didn’t bring a pencil have to sing a song in English. It’s working pretty well, but every couple of days we get a song from a few that didn’t bring pencils. Last week 3 girls had to sing and the song they chose blew me away with the sweetest rendition of We Are the World. I had to wipe a more than a couple of tears away -so poignant.

I saw a message on FB that one of the school administrators posted- a photo of new baby kittens. The text was in Khmer so I google translated- ”kittens born at school. Soon they will be in the pockets of children’ . I’m picturing kids taking them, carrying them around and playing with them until they just die- noooooo! When I got to school the next day they were gone- when I asked what happened, I got a noncommittal answer that their mother must have taken them to a different place and that is what I am choosing to believe.

AND, probably the best news about school--- I found a shortcut! It’s pretty bumpy and kind of sandy, but it cuts at least 1 km off my ride and in 90 degree blazing sun, that means a lot! I have a whole system down now, 1 bottle of frozen water, 1 blue ice pack (starts out on my neck and then inside my shirt ½ way to school) and 1 frozen washcloth- a refreshing way to wipe the sweat out of my eyes.

There were some more fundraisers this month for another seriously ill young woman. She had a sinus infection and went to a local “doctor”. The “treatment” resulted in almost half her face rotting away and turning black. Luckily she knew someone who knew someone that worked at a social enterprise restaurant and they were able to raise money to take her to a hospital in Phnom Penh (the first 2 hospitals they took her to turned her away). She got good care, but sadly the infection had already taken too much of a toll and she died. Life is very precarious in this country.

The weather has actually been kind of nice the last couple of weeks- we’re getting the Mango Rains. It mostly rains at night at cools things down a bit- of course now there’s mud, but I guess I’d rather be dirty than hot. Before that it was brutal. I was at a couple of outdoor events in the evening and my clothes were literally dripping with sweat, so everyone’s enjoying the rain now.

April is Khmer New Year, school is closed for most of the month, tourist season is over and the town is much quieter- this means less traffic which means my chances of dying are about 30% less so that’s nice- if you don’t factor in the fact that everyone is drinking and driving over the holiday, so I guess it’s really a wash.

Sur s’dey chh’nam t’mey! HAPPY KHMER NEW YEAR!

Making amok baskets at cooking lesson

Making amok baskets at cooking lesson


Grade 6 Spitler School

Grade 6 Spitler School


Practicing for the school play

Practicing for the school play


Joss Stone !!

Joss Stone !!


Joss Stone fan

Joss Stone fan


Khmer traffic laws

Khmer traffic laws


Cashew

Cashew


Me and my finished amok

Me and my finished amok


Lucky and puppy

Lucky and puppy


Hungry salamander

Hungry salamander


Spitler Mom and family

Spitler Mom and family


Making my noodle soup at 60 Road!

Making my noodle soup at 60 Road!


I won beer!

I won beer!


Dinner at 60 Road street market

Dinner at 60 Road street market


Carnival ride 60 Road

Carnival ride 60 Road

Posted by travelinglisa 17:00 Archived in Cambodia Comments (0)

Mingalabar from Myanmar!

Mingalabar is a standard greeting that means “Good Luck to You” in Burmese. My friend Jim and I had a great time in Myanmar- the hands down winner for the country with the highest concentration of Buddhist temples per square mile- despite a few mishaps along the way.

You know that little ping of joy you feel when you see your luggage arrive on the baggage carousel? We’ll we didn’t feel it. Our bags were lost for almost 3 days and getting reunited witth them was not easy. Everyone always asks me how I manage in countries where I don’t speak the language and I answer that,with gestures and a couple of local phrases, I get along just fine. This time,not so much. It was a comedy of errors, misunderstandings, bad phone service,language barriers, a fairly undeveloped tourist infrastructure and the fact that we were changing towns and hotels faster than the airline baggage service could keep up :)

One of the main reasons I wanted to go to Mandalay was to see the U Bein Bridge- I planned to go at sunset and then sunrise the next day. But because we spent so much time in the airport trying to file the missing luggage report we couldn’t get to the bridge in time for sunset, so we settled on seeing it from Mandalay Hill.

To get to the top you can either walk up about 500 steps through the dirty pagoda or drive up. When our cab driver dropped us off at the bottom, he apparently confused us for the type of people that want to step in piles of rooster poop in our bare feet (you cannot wear shoes or socks in any pagoda ever). Once we figured out the scoop, we had to track him down and get him to drive us up to the top. The sunset was nice, but the best part was all the lovely monks wandering around and practicing their English with the tourists.

The next morning, we headed out at sunrise to U Bein. Unfortunately, our guide thought I would want to be on top of the bridge rather than on the ground where the good photos happen, so I missed out again. That being said, we did make it down eventually and got some pretty good shots. It’s the longest teakwood bridge in the world and was built in 1850, really beautiful.

From there we went down to the jetty to take a boat ride up the Arewaddy (Irrawaddy) River to Mingun and the first of MANY pagodas (payas in Burmese) of the trip. I do love floating along Asian rivers, so it was a nice day, although there was not much water traffic which was kind of odd. Getting on and off the boat was interesting… you have to walk across long thin planks between other boats to get to your boat, and then again to get to the shore. One false move and you’re done for-arrgh!

Then it was into a van for a 4 hour drive through the countryside to Bagan. Along the way, we saw one of the MOST interesting things I’ve ever seen. Young monks-to-be on horseback on their way to join the Monastery. Half the village was in the procession and the other half was standing on the side of the road with us, snapping pics on their phones as the decorated ox carts,horses, virgins and dancers went by. It was freaking awesome! So lucky to have stumbled upon it.

It was kind of a let down when we got to Bagan. I’m not sure how we screwed up, but the hotel we booked was an ugly smelly empty tacky Chinese event venue about 40 minutes outside of town. We had to spend half of the next day finding new digs. Once we got settled and had a chance to explore, Bagan was just stunning. Plains full of gorgeous stupas dating from the 12<sup>th</sup> century everywhere. The travel books say the best way to see them is by bicycle or ebike. When I read that, I thought, &#8220;It’s a long hot ride around the plain of stupas, ebike is clearly the better choice&#8221;. What I didn’t know, was that &#8220;ebike&#8221; is Burmese for <u>fast heavy scary motorcycle</u>. Even though I’ve never driven a moto before in my life, I somehow thought it would be a good idea to do it in a small third world country. In a rural town. With no hospital. So it’s good that when I crashed (literally 20 seconds after I got on) all I ended up with was a nasty bruised wrist, wounded pride and no broken bones. Luckily (there’s always a bright side!) Jim can drive a moto, so I just rode on his. That really turned out to be the best plan as I could read the maps and navigate. Don’t get me started on the quality of maps- I had 3 of them and was constantly cross referencing them all to make sure we found best payas to climb for sunsets. Lots of tiny steep steps to the top, but the views were absolutely incredible.

Our luggage finally caught up with us in this town, so it was nice to have some clean clothes and, the most important thing of all- hair products! Yay! Oh, I almost forgot about the part where we almost ended up in a Burmese jail! When we went back to the horrible hotel to pick up the bags and were leaving, the staff was saying some stuff to us that we couldn’t really understand. The most I could make out was something like &#8220;room charges&#8221; so we told them we had prepaid on line and left in the taxi. About 10 minutes into the drive, the cab driver gets a phone call, stops on the side of the road and tells us &#8220;we’ve got a big problem&#8221;. It turns out that, after going through our emails and booking receipts, we didn’t pay on line, but were actually supposed to pay the hotel in cash on check out. It was like a bad dream, we just couldn’t leave that awful place! So we hunted down an ATM, turned around and went back to pay. By the look on the staff’s faces, it was clear they thought we were flat out criminals and I’m glad they didn’t call the cops on us. Sorry!!

The next stop was to Nyaung Shwe, the town closest to Inle Lake. I loved this little place- very walkable, lots of good restaurant choices and, like all of Asia, cheap massages!! After walking a mile up to the top of a volcano in Bagan, my calves were screaming, so I went for the foot massage. Asian masseuses are famous for their strong hands, but mine must have been trying out for the Foot Massage Olympics. No matter how many times I asked her not to grind her thumbs with 1000 psi of pressure into my leg bones, she wouldn’t let up. If the fun you have on vacation is directly related to the number of bruises you end up with, I must have had a fantastic time!

The big draw of this area is Inle Lake &#8211; the fishermen are famous for rowing their boat with one leg and the floating villages are the prettiest I’ve ever seen. There’s one village that is half on land and half floating, and there’s a long boardwalk between the two. We happened to be there when the school (on land) let out and the kids all gathered at the end of the boardwalk to catch the school bus/boat. The lady boat drivers would paddle up in the dugouts, load up the kids and float them home! Our last stop was Yangon (formerly Rangoon), which was not my favorite city. The roads are 3 or 4 lanes, the traffic is pretty bad and there is no way to get to the other side other than making a mad dash through the middle of it all. The British built some beautiful colonial buildings in the downtown area, but they’ve almost all fallen into decay, so the whole place looks like a haunted house. One of the buildings, The Strand, has been gutted and completely remodeled into a fancy hotel. We went there for high tea and completely embarrassed ourselves by ordering one tea each, when it’s supposed to be for two. The little sandwiches were yummy, but there was no way I could eat all the tiny pastries. Too bad we couldn’t stay there, the rooms were around $550/night!

On Sunday we took a day trip to Bago, about 40km NE of Yangon. Along the way, we stopped at a beautiful cemetery for WW1 and WW2 soldiers of the British, Burmese and Indian armies. We boo hooed our way through the place reading the heartbreaking inscriptions on the gravestones. On a lighter note, the cemetery doubles as a hangout for local teenagers- they get all dressed up and take photos of each other- adorable!! A few times during the trip we were asked to be in their photos-apparently old white people are interesting?

I read in my guidebook that the payas of Bago (a very sacred and historic city) were like a carnival, but I really didn’t understand what that meant until I got there. All the payas we visited on the trip were full of tacky souvenir sellers (think plastic Buddhas with flashing neon halos), but Bago takes it one step further. There are actually carnival games to raise money for the pagoda- you don’t win prizes but try to throw your money into the moving bowls- my favorite was the little &#8220;monk go round&#8221;, kind of like a merry go round but with toy monks, seriously!!

The biggest attraction in Yangon is the Shwedagon Pagoda. It is really beautiful (and clean!), but to be honest, I was kind of pagoda-ed out by then, so it wasn’t as awe inspiring as I had hoped.

All in all, it was a great trip. With the exception of the thieving cab drivers, everyone was friendly and tried to be helpful. So helpful that when Jim had a piece of gum he was trying to get rid of and asked where he could throw it, 3 people immediately held out their hands for him to put it in!

Now I’m back in Siem Reap and headed off to school in a bit. Looking forward to my next adventure when Aida and Jose come to visit and we check out Hong Kong!!

U Bein Bridge

U Bein Bridge


Monk to be

Monk to be


Bagan

Bagan


Inle Lake Fisherman

Inle Lake Fisherman


Local ladies near Inle Lake

Local ladies near Inle Lake


Indein paya

Indein paya


Giant Lions at Mandalay Hill Pagoda

Giant Lions at Mandalay Hill Pagoda


Monk chat

Monk chat


Mandalay Hill at Sunset

Mandalay Hill at Sunset


Mandalay dinner

Mandalay dinner


The bill

The bill


This is not toast

This is not toast


Mandalay

Mandalay


Mandalay jetty

Mandalay jetty


The Plank

The Plank


An ethnic tribal lady

An ethnic tribal lady


Taxi anyone?

Taxi anyone?


Monks to be in the procession

Monks to be in the procession


The Virgins

The Virgins


Oh so beautiful!

Oh so beautiful!


The Littlest Monk to Be

The Littlest Monk to Be


Little monk

Little monk


More of the monk procession

More of the monk procession


Villagers watching

Villagers watching


Hello? yes, I&#38;#39;m a bit busy now/

Hello? yes, I&#38;#39;m a bit busy now/


The boys

The boys


How do I look?

How do I look?


Bagan

Bagan


Another temple

Another temple


Me

Me


Our Motto

Our Motto


OMG

OMG


Sunset over Bagan

Sunset over Bagan


Me

Me


Bagan

Bagan


I love this photo

I love this photo


Bagan

Bagan


Me

Me


Monk on vacation

Monk on vacation


Buddha

Buddha


Sunset in Bagan

Sunset in Bagan


Aww!

Aww!


Let sleeping dogs lie

Let sleeping dogs lie


YUM YUM YUM

YUM YUM YUM


On the road to Mt. Popa

On the road to Mt. Popa


Mt. Popa

Mt. Popa


Neon Buddha

Neon Buddha


Souvenirs

Souvenirs


Little Monks

Little Monks


Inle Lake fisherman

Inle Lake fisherman


Inle lady

Inle lady


Floating village house

Floating village house


Floating along

Floating along


Reflection

Reflection


Inle boat

Inle boat


Gotta wash the buffalo

Gotta wash the buffalo


Look at hims face!!

Look at hims face!!


Indein

Indein


Lion at Indein

Lion at Indein


Indeiin Buddah

Indeiin Buddah


Along the river

Along the river


At the Jumping Cat Monestary

At the Jumping Cat Monestary


Inle Lake fisherman

Inle Lake fisherman


Sunset Inle

Sunset Inle


Hello!

Hello!


YUM

YUM


Jim on the boardwalk

Jim on the boardwalk


School bus boat

School bus boat


Mingalar Market

Mingalar Market


Market lady

Market lady


Orange seller

Orange seller


Flower seller

Flower seller


Yangon

Yangon


High tea

High tea


The Strand

The Strand


Yangon

Yangon


Yangon

Yangon


Yangon

Yangon


Me on a Yangon street

Me on a Yangon street


Local restaurant Yangon

Local restaurant Yangon


Sad gravestone

Sad gravestone


Photo shoot at the cemetary

Photo shoot at the cemetary


Me and a teenager at the cemetary

Me and a teenager at the cemetary


Monk go Round

Monk go Round


Boys waiting to play the carnival game

Boys waiting to play the carnival game


Jade Buddah

Jade Buddah


Asleep on the job

Asleep on the job


Another carnival game

Another carnival game


Earthquake

Earthquake


Washing buddha at the temple

Washing buddha at the temple


Another teenage photoshoot!

Another teenage photoshoot!


Me at the Kings Palace

Me at the Kings Palace


Kambawathadi Palace

Kambawathadi Palace


Teak Facts

Teak Facts


Canoodling

Canoodling


Hanging with my new friend at the Snake Monastery

Hanging with my new friend at the Snake Monastery


Yangon

Yangon


Shwedagon Pagoda

Shwedagon Pagoda


Shwedagon pagoda

Shwedagon pagoda


Me at Schwedagon

Me at Schwedagon


Monk reading a newspaper

Monk reading a newspaper


Outside Shwedegon

Outside Shwedegon

Posted by travelinglisa 17:00 Archived in Myanmar Comments (0)

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