A Travellerspoint blog

Bath, Glastonbury, Wells, Lacock

Three trains and two buses later, I arrived at my B&B in Bath. It's a lovely Georgian townhouse owned by a sweet elderly couple. The expected floral décor and a bit dated, but very nice and breakfast is included. That’s good since I’ve been flying through money since I left London. Before I left, I had bought a London Pass, which included admission to all the sights and free bus/train/tube. It was really great. Plus it’s easy to forget that 1 English pound = $1.52 US and not make the conversion. Now every time I go anywhere or do anything I have to pay and it’s starting to feel like real money. Luckily, England is the most expensive leg of the trip, so it’ll get cheaper from here.

I am intending on taking it a bit easier here, as I’ve just about worn myself out the past 3 weeks. And I’m here for 5 nights so I’ve actually unpacked! I just hope it all fits back in again when I leave.

At the local pub now drinking a new ale -Bath Gem. I am loving the beer here (but really, who am I kidding? Have I ever gone anywhere and not loved the beer?!)

The next day I took the bus into town as it was cold and rainy. The town center is nice and walkable so it may be possible to actually find my way around without getting lost. This is first UK town that seemed a bit dirty, but I’ve only had a glimpse. Got sidetracked for an extra hour in the Bath Abbey by a choir recital from a New Mexico group joined by an English choir- I love listening to music in these old churches- the acoustics are amazing. The abbey is not huge, but is quite beautiful.

Stopped for tea and a ginger butter bun (yum!) at Sally Lunn’s, a famous tea room here in Bath from the 1600’s. Loving the tea over here, it’s served in a teapot and you drink it with cream. It is really the thing on a rainy day.

Took an excellent free walking tour, the sun came out and my impression of the city is much nicer, though I do think it could do with a pressure cleaning. The buildings are made of a light colored stone that must be hard to keep clean. Anyway, Bath was really popular in the 1700-1800’s when people came here to bathe in the natural thermal spa waters. The ladies were transported to and from the spa ( and everywhere else) in sedan chairs supported on 12 foot poles carried by 2 men. If the guys weren’t paid the price they wanted, they’d take their customers a few blocks further down and drop them off and make them walk back -hence the expression "taken for a ride". Also, at the end of a dance, the sedan chairs were waiting outside the ballroom to transport everyone home. To hire a chair, you would call out “chair ho!” which later became “cheerio!”. I haven’t actually heard anyone say that, but they do say “cheers” instead of thank you or goodbye. Bath has a great Fashion Museum, wonderful clothes from all eras- Valentino, Chanel, Pucci.... J Lo's famous plunging green dress is there too.

Had an awesome dinner at Jaimie Oliver’s Italian restaurant here. Really delicious fish sampler- smoked salmon, fish dip, caviar, fish fingers and cockles, which are like teeny tiny little clams. Everything was so good I may have to eat there again.

Today was a day trip to Glastonbury and Wells. They’re not that far, but you have to take a local bus with lots of stops, so it takes about an hour. The weather looked really nice, but that didn’t last long- another cold rainy day was ahead. Glastonbury is full of shops specializing in all things magic, wiccan, new age/spiritual and faery. The Glastonbury abbey was destroyed by Henry VII. He confiscated the abbey’s wealth and had the abbot hanged, drawn and quartered at Glastonbury Tor in 1539. The ruins of the abbey were hauntingly beautiful and the surrounding park was lovely as well. It would have been a nice place to hang out for a couple more hours if it was a nicer day. So now I’ve visited Tintagel, where King Arthur was born, and Glastonbury, the place where he and Guinevere were supposedly buried.

Despite the weather I decided to walk up to the top of the Tor, which is a huge hill in the middle of the Somerset plain. The first residents of the Tor were supposedly Faeries and their King, Gwyn ap Nudd. Fairy hills were thought of as hollow, in the sense that there was another realm within them, making the hill seem bigger inside than out. This inner realm was called Annwn or Avalon. A persistent ancient belief says there’s an entrance to Avalon somewhere on the Tor, which was known as a strange, magical place. Another book I love is Mists of Avalon, so again, fun to visit the place in which it is set.

It was a really long hike to the base of the Tor and a steep climb up, but the views were well worth it. The remains of St Michael’s church built in the 1300’s are at the top. Just the restored tower is left.

Next I went to a small town called Wells which is famous for its Cathedral. The church really is beautiful and has an unusual architectural feature in the nave called scissor arches. I couldn’t take photos in the church, but here’s a link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wells.cathedral.inverted.arch.arp.jpg. Surrounding the Bishop’s Palace was a moat with more camera shy swans. On the grounds of the palace were people dressed all in white playing croquet – at first I thought they were statues!

The next day I went to visit the Roman baths, which were very cool. The Romans had a temple to the goddess Minerva there and they made offerings to her by throwing stuff in the waters, so there a lot of great artifacts. My favorites were these pewter squares engraved with curses. For instance one was a compliant about the theft of a female slave named Vilbia and names some possible culprits. Apparently the gods were charged with the implementation of the curse.

Last day in Bath:( I really did like this town. It’s big enough to have lots to do, small enough that I didn’t get lost once and close enough to do day trips to other towns.

This day I took the bus to Lacock, or rather, I took the bus past Lacock. Buses usually stop on the outskirts of a town and then again in what is the obvious town center. Well not this one. The town is so small there’s only one stop and I missed it. Got out a few miles down the road and got the next bus back to the town. This place was used in some Harry Potter films and is known for half timbered houses and is very picturesque.

It was turning out to be decent day for a change. I had downloaded a pdf map of a 2 mile walk in the nearby countryside and set off. Everything was going well until I got to this set of directions:

“Walk over the bridge, keeping the weir to your right. Walk up the hill, past the allotments on your left”. There are several problems here: 1. What’s a weir? 2. What’s an allotment? 3. I can’t tell my right from my left so #1 & #2 don’t really matter anyway. I saw footpath and I took it. It was a nice walk, saw some sweet sheep, got to a road and walked along it thinking “I haven’t really gone that far, if I get lost I can just turn around and retrace my steps. Plus, I think I’m probably going in right direction, the sun was out, it was really nice, so I kept going. 15 minutes later I consult the map again: “walk down the path, past Wicket Gate Cottage. Continue along the path then turn right and then right again over Stone Bridge, then thru a gate. Take the footpath diagonally thru the field”. I happened to be standing in front of a cute thatched roof cottage. There was no name- was this Wicker Cottage? Here’s a bridge nearby made of stone, could this be Stone Bridge? Let’s say yes. I go thru the gate and head into the field.

Twenty minutes later, I’m thinking I could quite possibly be lost and start thinking of James Franco in 128 Hours. For no reason really, it’s like 9 hours until dark and my arm is certainly not trapped by a boulder. I figure I’m sure to see a farmhouse or someone sooner or later. Sure enough after 10 or so minutes 3 big friendly wet dogs run up to me, their owners not far behind. “Hello! I may or may not be lost. Am I headed to Lacock?” They tell me I can either turn around and go back the way I came (easier) or keep going thru pasture veering to the right (harder). Well, I didn’t come all this way to wimp out, so I keep going thru the field. About twenty minutes and another field later, I come across 2 more dogs and their owners. “Hello! I may or may not be lost…”. They send me to the path to the right and straight into a herd of cows. I’m thinking these are very large animals, but they are just laying around, so I’m sure it’s fine. As I start walking among them, they all start standing up and I got just a little concerned but it seem they were just interested, not mean. By this time I can see the town ahead, so I hit the pub for a lovely beer trio sampler of Henry IPA, Horizon and Bishop’s Tipple. Great way to end the day and my adventures in England. I really enjoyed my time here and hope I can make it back some day. Cheers!

Next stop Paris! What a life!!!

Bath Cathedral

Bath Cathedral


Flood control in Bath City

Flood control in Bath City


Little black dress collection

Little black dress collection


Sedan chair

Sedan chair


Glastonbury Abbey

Glastonbury Abbey


Glastonbury Abbey grounds

Glastonbury Abbey grounds


St. Michael's Tower on thr Tor

St. Michael's Tower on thr Tor


View from top of Tor over Somerset plain

View from top of Tor over Somerset plain


Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral


Wells house

Wells house


Me at Roman Baths

Me at Roman Baths


Roman Baths frieze

Roman Baths frieze


Goddess Minerva

Goddess Minerva


Lacock, half timbered house

Lacock, half timbered house


Wicker cottage?

Wicker cottage?


Sweet sheep

Sweet sheep


Not so ferocious cows

Not so ferocious cows


Lacock Abbey

Lacock Abbey


Trio of beers!

Trio of beers!


Still life with antique watering cans

Still life with antique watering cans

Posted by travelinglisa 17:00 Archived in United Kingdom Comments (0)

Wadebridge, Cornwall

Fell sound asleep on the train from Penzance to Bodmin and almost missed my stop. I took the local bus with a maniacal driver to Wadebridge, where I'll be for the next 4 nights. The guy at whose house I’m staying was supposed to leave the key for me, but when I got there it wasn’t there. He had been little hard to get a hold of, so I was wondering how this was all going to work out, but he showed up with the key a few minutes later.

Wadebridge is a smallish town in northern Cornwall that seems to be a good hub for some day trips to the coast, but the main reason I chose it was that The Royal Cornwall show is there. It’s very much like a country state fair, but with less rides and more animals. The food tents were amazing- all local products: honey, cider, cheese, meats, ice cream, pastries and pasties. Pasties are like pies folded in half stuffed with meat, cheese and vegetables. I got an onion and cheese pastie and a bottle of local pear juice for lunch. The pastie was OK, lots of dough and very heavy, but the juice was heaven. It was like drinking a perfectly ripe, perfectly sweet liquid pear. I should have written down the name of the orchard so I could send some to everyone.

After lunch I watched some horse jumping and a dog show, then on to the animal exhibitions- goat judging, sheep shearing, chickens, rabbits, cows (saw the MOST enormous bull tied by a gold ring in his nose to what seemed a much too flimsy post), wool judging, the egg competition, and then hit the ferret races. The Royal Air force parachuted into the main ring, then it was time for the parade of animals, which was very cool. All the first, second and third place winners were presented with their ribbons and flowers. One cow got a little feisty and for a minute I was picturing a stampede, but his handler got him back under control.

The next day I went to the coastal towns of Port Isaac and Tintagel. Port Isaac was one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen. The town has cute shops and great local art galleries. The harbor is between 2 cliffs with covered with grass and wildflowers. I hiked up to the top and ate a most delicious apricot pastry that I had picked up from the town bakery earlier. There are wonderful paths along the hilltop and it was a lovely sunny, fairly warm day. I would still be there if I didn’t have other places to explore.

Back to the pastry for a minute. There is tea shop every other storefront, mostly open just from 10-3. English people sure love tea and pastries and I am a complete convert. The tea is so delicious and warming and the sweets are so good. I have completely forgotten anything about cholesterol or calories. Luckily I am doing tons of walking so I hope I won’t have to buy larger clothes any time soon.

I then took a bus to Tintagel, where Uther Pendragon lived, where King Arthur was born and also the home of the First Duke of Cornwall. The castle is in ruins but it is stunning, especially as it’s set on the coast. There are hundreds of steps up and down the hill to get to the various sites, so it was quite a workout, but well worth it. The Once and Future King is one of my all-time favorite books, so to be able to see where some of it took place is so cool. And yes, I know it is supposed to be just myth, but I couldn’t care less- I love it all.

The next day, I rented a bike and cycled to Padstow along the Camel River Estuary trail. It was a nice ride at low tide so people were out collecting shellfish. I also saw a black swan, but I am not having luck with swan photos, they see me and swim away, so I’ll just have to remember how beautiful he was. Had fish and chips for lunch and, I know people will laugh at this, but Long John Silvers is still my favorite!!

Thank you to Karen at my book club for suggesting I add Cornwall to my itinerary- i would have hated to miss this place.

Next stop-Bath!

Goat judging

Goat judging


The winning eggs!

The winning eggs!


At the ferret race

At the ferret race


The parade of animals

The parade of animals


Best cow!

Best cow!


Port Isaac

Port Isaac


Tintagel

Tintagel


Merlin's cave

Merlin's cave


Padstow Harbor

Padstow Harbor


Swans swimming away from me.

Swans swimming away from me.

Posted by travelinglisa 17:00 Archived in United Kingdom Comments (0)

Penzance, Cornwall

Got up at 5:30 to catch the train from Salisbury to Penzance, on the southwest coast of Cornwall. I could live on a train- it's so relaxing-read, nap, watch the countryside go by, then get lulled back to the nap again. Got my first sight of the ocean, and saw Saint Michael’s Mount, an old abbey on a hill out in the sea that you can walk to at low tide or take a ferry to if the tide is in.

Was met at the train station by a guy named Leo, who is a friend of the lady who owns the house I’m staying in as she’s out of town. When she said he’d pick me up I was all "yay! I won’t have to lug my stuff from the train station!!" Unfortunately he came to pick me up on a bike, so I had to walk anyway (uphill no less). It’s a good thing he did, because I would never have found her house on my own. It’s an historical Georgian townhouse and a bit eclectic, very dusty and likely haunted. I’m staying there with this mysterious man named Julian, that both the owner and Leo have been a bit vague about. I feel like they are all slightly inbred former aristocracy.

On my way to the cellphone store (where I spend at least 30 minutes a day trying to get the blackberry to work for more than 5 minutes at a time) I actually passed an organic restaurant recommended by lonely planet- good thing, because I was starving to death. Had a lovely leek and goat cheese tart with a salad -most delish! Then I headed out to the tourist info office to find out how to get around the area. While there are plenty of buses, turns out you have to know how to read a bus schedule, a skill I apparently do not possess.

Nevertheless, the next morning I set out for St. Michael’s Mount in nearby Marizion, having actually gotten on the right bus. I had a chat at the bus stop with an elderly lady who lived in “housing”, i.e. subsidized housing. Turns out they have the same NIMBY problems here as in the US. Turns out parking is limited and the homeowners in the area don’t want the people living in the affordable apartments to use a parking space for more than 20 minutes at a time. It was funny how everything she said about the haves and have nots resonated perfectly with our red/blue divide.

When I got to Marazion, I was starving, so I decided to stop for a cream tea, a Cornish specialty-a pot of tea, a couple of scones with jam and clotted cream. Well it was, as the English say, rubbish. The jam and clotted cream were prepackaged and the scones were cold and stale. By the time I got out of there, could see the tide was coming in a bit, but the causeway was still open. I wasted precious time with the damn scones and the tide, she was a turnin’. Unfortunately, I got stuck behind a really slow older couple and by the time I was halfway across, the waves were washing over and my shoes and socks got totally soaked which was not good at all in the 50 degree weather.

Anyway, I started in the gardens, which, due to granite rock absorbing the heat and the way the winds hit, are surprisingly tropical (but still cold). Absolutely stunning! I walked around there and up and down there for hours. The castle was also good. It is owned by an actual Lord, who still lives in part of the castle with his family. Queen Elizabeth visited them there only last week.

Took the ferry back to shore and that’s when I realized that the drop off point for a bus, isn’t necessarily the same place as where you pick up the return bus. Lesson learned.

Next I went to a tiny town called Mousehole and had lunch (homity pie- a local specialty of potatoes, onions and parsley in a crust). It’s a cute little fishing village with some small galleries and shops. I couldn’t believe kids were swimming in the harbor! But I learned from camping with Mikey and Wyatt that boys apparently have some special gene so they don’t feel the cold.

Penzance is a great town with a big marine industry. The Cornish don’t seem quite as friendly as the English, but they are still very nice. I finally met Julian and what a character! In 10 minutes I learned that he had been arrested on suspicion of gun running in Zimbabwe, but luckily his cousin, the attorney general in neighboring Botswana, got him out using diplomatic immunity; got stabbed in India, but luckily he was with his friend, the chief of police, at the time; and got shot by a cattle rustler in a the jungle, but luckily was with his friend with connections to the Botswana Defense agency so they were able to radio for a helicopter and get him to a doctor. He’s also a big game hunter (but an admittedly terrible shot), a nightclub owner, former Burmese morphine smuggler, a sculptor and a department store manager. And he has only about 8 teeth.

Today I took a driving/hiking tour with a guide to more western Cornwall. Dairy farms, moors, ancient standing stones, rugged cliffs, stone houses, wildflowers, sandy beaches- a really gorgeous area. I am so glad I came down here. We hiked to several areas of prehistoric stone formations. The donut shaped stone at Men an Tol is supposedly a cure for rickets. You strip naked and climb through the hole and voila, you are cured. I did not test it out as I am ricket-free and even if I wasn't, it was too cold to be naked outside. We stopped in the cutest café so I could have a proper cream tea and it was delicious! The only other person on the tour was a Welsh girl, so I learned a lot about the end of the mining industry and their economy. Lots of parallels with US towns suffering due to outsourcing to China.

Next took a short train ride to St. Ives, a beachy, artist town with lots of ice cream shops-the sun finally came out, so out of the wind it was nice and warm (of course, I’m still wearing jeans and a sweater, but at least I could take my jacket off!) Everyone else was in shorts. Had a really great lunch at a beach cafe, parsnip soup and haloumi (a yummy kind of cheese). Both had edible flower garnish which was kind of cool as on my outing yesterday, we ate several plants growing along the trails, but the only flower we tasted was honeysuckle.

Met up with Julian for beer ( Doom Bar- my new absolute favorite) and a walk around the town. Turns out the former model Jean Shrimpton lives here and runs a hotel and the Bronte sisters lived here as well. Penzance kind of reminds me of key west- it’s the end of the line for the railroad, so a lot of people just get off and stay here. Artsy, quirky, fishing village vibe.

Edit on the number of Julian’s teeth. After spending more time with him 8 is an exaggeration, I think it's closer to 2. He was a really nice guy and a great tour guide.

The next day I went to Penlee Gardens and Gallery. The exhibition at the gallery was about a woman named Florence and her husband Alfred Munnings, he an artist and she a model.They were part of the Newlyn School, an artist community in a town near Penzance. Florence fell in love with her husband’s friend who felt he had to do the honorable thing and leave town. She was devastated and committed suicide. A movie, Summer in February, about their story is coming out next week. It was all filmed in Cornwall, so go see it and you’ll see what I mean about how beautiful it is here.

St. Michael's Mount

St. Michael's Mount


St. Michael's gardens

St. Michael's gardens


The Cornish flag

The Cornish flag


Doom Bar!!

Doom Bar!!


Me at St. Michael's

Me at St. Michael's


The kitchen decor in the house I stayed in.

The kitchen decor in the house I stayed in.


Cornwall beauty

Cornwall beauty


Men an tol stones

Men an tol stones


Cornish beach

Cornish beach


Yummy soup

Yummy soup

Posted by travelinglisa 17:00 Archived in United Kingdom Comments (0)

Salisbury and Stonehenge

Salisbury is a day time town for sure. I arrived around 7pm and went in search of food and I was basically the only person on the streets. I'm definitely not in London anymore.

One of my splurges on this trip was a guided after hours tour of Stonehenge and the other sites in the area. On the way, we took a drive through the English countryside and it was just like being in a postcard-bright yellow fields of rapeseed (canola), thatched roof cottages, wildflowers, county manor houses, streams, sheep and cows. We also passed by Sting's mansion-very nice.

My guide was a local archeologist and he was excellent. We went to a Darrington Wells, which is where they think the people who built Stonehenge lived. We also did a couple of long hikes through sheep fields to see barrows (burial mounds). Then we approached Stonehenge taking the same pathway as the prehistoric people did. It's hidden by a hill, there's nothing else around, and then these giant standing stones appear as you crest the hill. It's pretty amazing. The current theory is that Stonehenge was used for ancestor worship and burials. It was so great to visit there after the hoards of tourists had left and watch the changing light as the sun moved toward the horizon.

The next day I checked out Salisbury Cathedral and climbed the 333 steps to the bell tower. I have to say, I was a bit worried about my knee- I've been giving it quite a workout, but I did fine, only a little swollen the next day. The views from the top were quite worth it. The cathedral was started in the early 1200's and consecrated in 1258. The giant bell tower was added around 1315. There are tombs of knights, the most famous is William of Longespree, half brother of King James and one of the advisors on the Magna Carat. One of the 4 original copies is here and on display. From Wikipedia: Magna Carta (Latin for Great Charter),was the first document forced onto a King of England by a group of his subjects, the feudal barons, in an attempt to limit his powers by law and protect their privileges . The charter was an important part of the extensive historical process that led to the rule of constitutional law in the English speaking world. Magna Carta was important in the colonization of American colonies as England's legal system was used as a model for many of the colonies as they were developing their own legal systems.

Anyway, there was an art show going on while I was there and these people from Catalan formed this human spire in front the Cathedral spire, so that was kind of cool.

Next stop: Penzance in Cornwall.

Me and Stonehenge!

Me and Stonehenge!


Early evening. The sun doesn't set until 10pm

Early evening. The sun doesn't set until 10pm


Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral


Human tower and bell tower

Human tower and bell tower


Nave to altar

Nave to altar


In the bell tower

In the bell tower


Beautiful countryside

Beautiful countryside


River Avon

River Avon

Posted by travelinglisa 17:00 Archived in United Kingdom Comments (0)

London Part 3

Met up with another solo traveler, Linda from SF. She had been to London several times, but not to Windsor Castle. That wasn’t on my list, but they have a changing of the guards so I was game. We got there in time for the changing ceremony, but just then a bus pulled up and we’re like “ha ha, they just bring the new guards by bus now”. Sure enough that’s what they did. Not sure why but the ceremony was cancelled that day. Anyway the castle and church were stunning. We got to see the royal apartments including the entry hall where dignitaries arrive and the state dining room. I’ll be looking for those places the next time there’s an event at the castle.

We had an ale and nice lunch at a local pub, then headed back to London. When we got off the tube, Big Ben was staring me right smack in the face. Pretty impressive. Westminster Abbey and Parliament were also there, so we walked around a bit despite the cold rain. Next we hit the Churchill war rooms, which were more interesting than I thought they’d be. There was a big museum about his life and career, about which I knew very little. Turns out he was responsible for lots of social reforms: minimum wage, miners rights, prison reform, health insurance etc. I am going to have to read up on him, he led a fascinating life.

We then went to Soho for dinner and passed by Carnaby street which was sadly filled with shops like the Gap, H&M… so much for fashion history :(

Linda is off to Croatia next and will be in Paris the same time as Deb and I, so we'll meet up again there and I can get the scoop on Croatia.

The next day, I spent all day at the British Museum. I had been looking forward to this for a while. It was great! Took a 3 docent led tours: Japan, Mesopotamia and Assyria. Assyria was awesome. Excellent carved wall panels and huge statues that guarded part of a palace. They ruled the middle east from 2000 BC to 600 BC and were quite fierce. It seems like I should have known more about these guys than I do, so I'll just have to read up on them too.

Having just been to Greece, I was curious to see the Elgin marbles and hear the Brits side of the story. The Greeks are adamant that they were stolen and should be returned ASAP. The British say Well if we hadn’t taken them for safekeeping, they would have been vandalized, damaged by pollution, etc." They also made a point of saying how much better their eye level presentation is compared to the new Acropolis museum. That part is kind of true. All the exhibits at the British museum are really up close and personal, which is quite nice. Although I did cringe several time when kids where putting their sticky fingers all over a 2700 year old Egyptian sarcophagus. The Egyptian relics were truly amazing, but I had to wonder what was left in Egypt.

The next day I went out to Hampton Court and became all embroiled in Henry the VIII and his queens again. Went down a hallway haunted by Catherine Howard's ghost. She had escaped from her rooms where she had been imprisoned and was trying to get to the king to beg for her life. The guides said that more 911 calls originate from here than in any other part of the palace.

The gardens are beautiful as well and the famous yew maze is there too. I went in it because it seemed like it would be fun, but it was NOT. I'm not usually claustrophobic, but I didn't like it in there one bit. I hardly ever give up on stuff, but I ended up making a u turn and getting the heck out of there. "We’ll just go in here, so that you can say you’ve been, but it’s very simple. It’s absurd to call it a maze. You keep on taking the first turning to the right. We’ll just walk around for ten minutes, and then go and get some lunch." So said Harris, from Jerome K. Jerome’s Three Men in a Boat (1889). The tourists he led into the Maze subsequently got lost for hours.

That’s the end of London. While I did a lot, there is so much I have left to do and see there. I definitely have to return. And if I haven’t said yet, Londoners are the absolutely nicest and most polite people. Go London!!

Next stop Salisbury.

Windsor Castle

Windsor Castle


10 Downing Street door

10 Downing Street door


Me and Parliament

Me and Parliament


Egyptian kitty 😊

Egyptian kitty 😊


The Rosetta Stone!

The Rosetta Stone!


Hampton Court Banquet Hall

Hampton Court Banquet Hall


Samurai armor

Samurai armor


Assyrian guard statues

Assyrian guard statues


Parthenon freize

Parthenon freize

Posted by travelinglisa 17:00 Archived in United Kingdom Comments (0)

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